Certificate Courses

Being Human: Hardships Everyone Encounters

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Price: $350.00
Avg. Completion Time: 6 hours

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When you think of the term “mental health,” does your mind quickly jump to the extremes? While the extreme situations of mental health certainly warrant attention, we can easily overlook that each and every person possesses mental health ranging anywhere from dangerously negative to very positive. Individual mental health is influenced by many factors such as our current age and similar life circumstances, how we see ourselves and others, and the situations of stress we are facing.

In this Certificate Program, presenters cover several common hindrances to positive mental health that most of us encounter throughout life, whether in one’s own struggle or witnessing it in a close friend, family member, colleague, or fellow parishioner. Who can say they have never seen a battle with perfectionism, a struggle to set or maintain appropriate relationship boundaries, contention with the reality of growing older, or the pain of grief and loss?

Certificate Program Description

This course is designed to provide an in-depth look at various challenges that each human being encounters in the course of life, specifically boundary issues in relationships, dealing with perfectionism, the reality of aging, and finally the grieving process.

By the end of this certificate program, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the origins of healthy and unhealthy boundaries.
  2. Explain distinctions within types of boundaries and identify tools for fostering healthy boundaries.
  3. Explain how perfectionism commonly develops in Western culture as well as how it manifests itself.
  4. Discuss the clinical technique presented for reducing or eliminating the maladaptive beliefs and behaviors of perfectionism within a short period of time.
  5. Identify key elements of the midlife crisis and some of the psychological challenges for the Baby Boomer generation as they enter into their senior years.
  6. Discuss midlife and senior adjustment to aging from the Darwinian and Humanist perspectives and consider the protective influences of a Catholic anthropology that is being developed at the Institute for the Psychological Sciences in Arlington, VA.
  7. Discuss some introductory intervention issues regarding seniors for ministers and psychologists with respect to the aging population.
  8. Explain the five-stage Kubler-Ross model of bereavement and some common critiques of this model.
  9. Discuss the main components of resilience-centered models of bereavement.

Sequence of Certificate Program Webinars

Determining & Fostering Healthy Boundaries by Ian Butler, LMHP, M.A., M.T.S. (1 hr 22 min)

Boundaries impairments are frequently encountered within the clinical population in one of two ways: either as the presenting problem itself or as an exacerbating feature of the clinical focus (e.g., marital therapy, parenting, etc.), making it a relevant topic today.  This presentation will cover boundary formation in children as a feature of normal attachment principles in addition to boundary impairments and tools for correcting boundary problems.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this seminar participants will:

  1. Identify the origins of healthy and unhealthy boundaries.
  2. Explain distinctions within types of boundaries, including open versus closed or internal versus external.
  3. Identify and discuss tools for fostering growth and developing healthy boundaries.

Healing Perfectionism by Ian Butler, LMHP, M.A., M.T.S, (1 hr 30 min)

Perfectionism, defined as a deep-seated sense of unlovableness, unworthiness or inability to ‘measure up,’ and typically accompanied by severe self-criticism and a compulsive striving for some kind of excellence (e.g., academics, ‘niceness,’ thinness, work, sports, etc.) is rampant in Western culture.  Some would estimate that fully half of Americans struggle with some form of low-esteem and lack of fulfillment rooted in this problem.  In certain populations the percentages are even greater (e.g., higher education, the seminarians population, etc.).  This presentation will outline the origins of this growing problem, point out the consequences of it upon the culture and among Christians, and offer a specific clinical tool for improving, and for many, completely eliminating all symptoms of the problem.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this seminar participants will:

  1. Explain how perfectionism commonly develops in Western culture.
  2. Identify common ways in which perfectionism manifests itself within individuals.
  3. Discuss the clinical technique presented for reducing or eliminating the maladaptive beliefs and behaviors of perfectionism within a short period of time.

Taking the "Crisis" Out of Mid-Life: A Catholic Perspective on Aging by Philip Scrofani, Ph.D., ABPP (1 hr 28 min)

Americans spend billions of dollars each year trying to escape the effects of aging. Mention the words “midlife crisis” and you will typically hear this distinct and growing population reduced to off-color jokes and tired stereotypes. Perhaps most disheartening is the tendency in our society to deny the simple fact of growing older. The result is an epidemic of psychological and spiritual dysfunction among older Americans.

Understanding and treating people facing the challenges of the midlife and senior years takes a unique set of skills, and a wide-ranging perspective. In his engaging presentation, Taking the “Crisis” out of Midlife, Dr. Philip Scrofani, Ph.D., ABPP, explains why so many Americans perceive aging in a negative light, and counters with a Christian model that adds a positive, transcendent dimension to the aging process.

In his two-hour presentation, Dr. Scrofani compares the foundational world-views and value-systems of the five living generational groups, followed by a thought-provoking analysis of three anthropological viewpoints. The midlife and senior life stages are discussed from each perspective, and the therapeutic benefits of a Catholic vision of the human person are developed.

In the final part of his presentation, Dr. Scrofani explores some of the challenges ministers and Catholic psychologists face in dealing with the problems associated with aging, and offers a vision for how faith integration can give this growing population the hope of growing older with grace and dignity.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this seminar participants will:

  1. Identify the increasing aging population in American society and the ways aging might be seen differently by the five living generations in American society, beginning with the World War II generation.
  2. Identify key elements of the midlife crisis and some of the psychological challenges for the Baby Boomer generation as they enter into their senior years.
  3. Discuss midlife and senior adjustment to aging from the Darwinian and Humanist perspectives and consider the protective influences of a Catholic anthropology that is being developed at the Institute for the Psychological Sciences in Arlington, VA.
  4. Discuss some introductory intervention issues regarding seniors for ministers and psychologists with respect to the aging population.

A New Perspective on Grief & Loss by Gladys M. Sweeney, Ph.D. (1 hr 2 min)

Helping your clients deal with grief and loss is a complex process. This webinar begins by exploring the basic principles of the most popular model of grief and loss, the five-stage Kubler-Ross Model. Dr. Sweeney offers some criticisms and shortcomings of Kubler-Ross, and then explains other empirically-supported alternative models including Worden’s Model, the Dual-Process Model of Grieving, the Psychological Resilience Model and Bonnano’s Model.  This webinar will also cover the importance of the role of resilience in coping with grief and loss.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this seminar participants will:

  1. Explain the five-stage Kubler-Ross model of bereavement.
  2. Identify some common critiques of the Kubler-Ross model.
  3. Discuss the main components of resilience-centered models of bereavement.

Instructor Biography

Ian Butler, LMHP, M.A., M.T.S.

Ian Butler, LMHP, M.A., M.T.S. is a Catholic clinician who has worked since 1999 as a counselor for Catholic Social Services with the Diocese of Lincoln, Nebraska, a clinical site specializing in the integration of the truths of the Catholic faith with Psychology. He has a Masters in Counseling from Franciscan University with a concentration in Christian Counseling, as well as a Masters in Theological Studies from Ave Maria University’s Institute for Pastoral Theology.

Since 2006, Ian has increasingly focused his clinical work toward providing professional counseling services by telephone to Catholics around the world, many of whom are unable to find faithful Catholic counseling in their area. He is the Executive Director of Holy Family Counseling Services and is currently developing an apostolate to work specifically with priests and seminarians: St. John Vianney Counseling Services. Since 2007, he has been a faculty member for the Institute for Priestly Formation, a summer seminary in Omaha, Nebraska, that currently draws 175 seminarians annually for a 10 week program focusing on deepening the prayer life of seminarians and removing or healing obstacles to healthy prayer and ministry. Since 2011, he has assisted in the human formation of aspirants for the diaconate program of the Archdiocese of Omaha. He is married and has three children.

Philip Scrofani, Ph.D., ABPP

Dr. Scrofani, Ph.D., ABPP is currently a full-time, Associate Professor at Divine Mercy University. His expertise is in clinical psychology, cognitive-behavioral therapy, group therapy, and research review, and he teaches in these areas. He has been Board Certified by the American Board of Professional Psychology since 1990. Dr. Scrofani was the Director of Family Psychotherapy Training for five years and Director of Psychology for the Commission on Mental Health Services in Washington, D.C. for 12 years. In that capacity, he had oversight responsibility for approximately 100 clinical psychologists and administrative responsibility for an APA accredited psychology internship. He later accepted a faculty position with the Psychiatry Residency Training Program for the Department of Mental Health in Washington, where he continues to be involved in the training of 32 physicians in residency for psychiatry. He joined the faculty at IPS in 2004.

Gladys M. Sweeney, Ph.D.

Prior to her appointment as Dean Emeritus and Senior Scholar in the spring of 2012, Gladys Sweeney, Ph.D. held the position of Academic Dean since IPS’ founding. She served as the Executive Director of the Catholic Institute for the Psychological Sciences from 1997-1998. She has lectured at the North American College in Rome and at the Pontifical University Regina Apostolorum in Rome. She has been a faculty member of the Division of Child Psychiatry, Department of Pediatrics, at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Sweeney’s area of interest is the integration of the psychological sciences with the Catholic view of the human person and she has published in this area. Dr. Sweeney has co-edited Human Nature in its Fullness: A Roman Catholic Perspective CUA Press, July, 2006.